What is Dads4Daughters?

Dads4Daughters aim directly to enlist fathers in the achievement of full equality in the workplace. Inspired by the UN’s HeForShe initiative, it is based on the firm belief that feminism should not simply be a female preserve and that it is in the interests of both men and women to strive for greater equality of opportunity. It advocates employers’ active support of both greater diversity and also men’s contribution to family life.

Schools

What can be achieved?

Understanding the issues, especially the unconscious biases, which prevent full gender equality in the workspace.

Raising awareness of theses issues, particularly amongst men.

Celebrating the role of working fathers.

Redefining both modern fatherhood and motherhood.

Preparing young people for the challenges of the modern workplace.

Understanding and exposing the problem

Conduct a survey of alumni on their experiences of gender inequality in the workplace. A list of possible questions can be found here.

Engaging fathers – potentially as corporate ambassadors – by inviting them to focus group. You can attempt to attract corporate sponsorship for your event at this point.

Send parents the unconscious bias test.

Organise an event

An event could be organised around Dads4Daughters Day (15th March) which follows a week after International Women’s Day. Alternatively Father’s Day presents an appropriate time to hold an event.

Events are probably best held in the evening and for 15 to 18 year olds with their fathers (or close male relative).

Send out press release and attempt to attract media interest.

Activities at the event could include:

  • A panel of alumni, possibly with their own fathers
  • A keynote speaker
  • An interactive quiz focused on the results of the alumni survey
  • Unconscious bias training devised by pupils/ keynote speaker
  • Pledge taking by fathers and daughters

Follow up

Encourage fathers to initiate similar events in their organisations.

Asking fathers to feedback how their behaviour may have changed and impacted their workplace.

Feedback to alumni community on findings from the survey/attendance at the evening.

Ensure 15th March is celebrated/marked annually.

Consider different ways of celebrating every year e.g. a dinner organised by fathers for their daughters or different discussion points and focuses.

Organisations

What can be achieved?

Opening a new conversation on the issue of gender equality.

Recognising of the role of, and pressures upon, modern fathers.

Celebrating diversity.

Raising awareness of the unconscious biases pervading the workplace.

Understanding the issues

Conduct a survey of the experience of both female and male staff; perhaps film a video recording people’s experiences.

Encourage all colleagues to take an unconscious bias test.

Organise an event

Arrange unconscious bias training. This could involve encouraging male colleagues role playing certain scenarios or be an appropriate follow up to the unconscious bias test.

Co-ordinate a panel discussion over a lunchtime to encourage open conversation about the issues.

Consider talking about the male to female ratio at all levels of employment within your organisation or maybe the national gender pay gap.

Organise regular reverse mentoring sessions.

Follow up

Consider setting up a reverse mentoring scheme.

Mark national Dads4Daughters Day on 15th March to follow up.